Hana Hou Magazine Cover Dec/Jan 2015

I am super excited to be on the cover of Hana Hou Magazine (The Magazine of Hawaiian Airlines) and have my images featured over 10 pages in the magazine about the snow in Hawaii! If you are flying Hawaiian Airlines be sure to get your copy!

Award Winning Photographer Ethan Tweedie Featured on CNN

My image of Kilauea Volcano was featured as the  lead image in CNN Travel’s article on “10 of the World’s Most Photogenic Volcanoes”!

Here is the full article at CNN

 

Kilauea Volcano

Kilauea Volcano

Lunar Eclipse Hawaii 2014


There was much anticipation for this years Lunar Eclipse and my plan was to head to the summit of the dormant volcano Mauna Kea and photograph the event from 13,796 feet.  Well one can plan all they want, but if you are shooting with a 500mm lens even the slightest movement of the lens would not be good and with winds clocking in at 40mph on the summit with an air temperature of around 28 degrees F,  I was less than enthusiastic.  Plan B ensued and I already knew of some areas that are often out of the wind, so off I went in search of a windless dark location on Mauna Kea.   The first several locations were aborted due to strong winds,  I kept on, finally finding a great spot at around 5500 feet on the slopes of the mountain.  Cold, check, windless, check no crowds, check!

After shooting the moon with my telephoto lens and realizing the “main event” had maxed out I decided to get a little creative.  I brought my 100 watt LED light and set my camera’s timer and ran out into the pasture and pointed my light at the moon.  I took two images, this was the best one of the two.

I hope you got to see the eclipse from your location, but if not I hope you enjoy my image!

Mahalo,

Ethan

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The Winter Side of the Milky Way, Mauna Kea Summit Hawaii

The Dark Side of the Milky Way as seen from close to 14,000 feet on snow covered dormant volcano Mauna Kea on the island of Hawaii

Porsche and Perseids, Ethan Tweedie Photography Show

October 16, 2013 PRESS RELEASE

Harbor Gallery announces an exciting show with Big Island Photographer and Parker School Graduate Ethan Tweedie on Friday, November 1st, from 6 to 8 PM. Light pupus and refreshments will be served.

This special show is titled “Porsche and Perseids” and features a number of Ethan’s celestial masterpieces as well as some photos taken atop Mauna Kea this past July when Ethan joined Gallery Owner Gunner Mench in driving his 50 year old Porsche to the summit for sunset and the stars.

Ethan says this was among the best sunsets he has ever witnessed, and what happened that night was almost unbelievable! The 1963 Porsche will also be on display for the show, bearing its Mauna Kea Benchmark Badge on the rear grill.

The Perseid Meteor Showers happen every year in early August, and Ethan was invited by park rangers at Pu’ukohola to photograph the shower together with the Heiau, achieving mind boggling results after taking over 160 exposures of 30 seconds in a single night. More photos were taken along with Halemaumau’s eruption, capturing meteors, the moon, and ghostly surroundings, achieving a view that the naked eye cannot see in the dim light, but is captured brilliantly with his high quality Canon cameras and special equipment. Most of the prints are offered being printed on metal, with the most superb color rendition and crisp clarity available with today’s printing technology.

Harbor Gallery is located in Kawaihae, just north of the Kohala resorts and next to Café Pesto. The gallery is open daily from 11:30 until 8:30. Phone 808-882-1510 to reach Gunner & Elli Mench, or visit their website at www.harborgallery.biz.

 

Big Island Lava Ocean Entry

6AM, 6:30AM and 7AM

 

What a morning!

After almost a year without lava entering the ocean, Kilauea ramped up her activity just in time for the 30th Anniversary of the current eruptive phase!!

My day started out at 1:15 AM in order to make it to Pohoiki Boat Ramp (Puna) by 4:30AM.  We all boarded the Lava Ocean Adventures tour boat and took the 45 minute boat ride out to the where the lava was entering the ocean.  It was great seeing all the stars and even the Southern Cross on the way, but most of us were pretty tentative on whether we were going to see lava or not as there is no way of knowing till you get there.

About a mile out from the site we could see the lava and lots of it!!  There were two distinct lava entries as we approached and Captain Shane Turpin slowed the boat down to creep.   We were still a good football field away and you can feel the radiant heat from the lava!  As we got closer it was still pitch dark and the photography wouldn’t be super good so I spent some time just in awe of the amazing spectacle before my eyes.  The first picture was from that time frame.

Captain Turpin kept the boat moving in between the two ocean entries and made sure both sides got equal amounts of viewing although I wish we could move side to side, but trust me one thing you don’t want to do is rock the boat!  As the light got brighter towards sunrise the photo ops got really good with the twilight sky and eventually the sun came up to reveal the scene in daylight!  The whole time out there you could see, smell and hear the lava as it hissed and sputtered into the water.  WOW!

If you are on the Big Island and there is lava entering the ocean this is a must see and do tour.

Ethan

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Kohala Mountain Road Moonbow

It was a blustery evening with driving rain and the hopes of capturing another Moonbow looked dismal.  As I left my house I could see the bright moonlight from a 98% full moon still relatively low in the sky, but it was very windy and rainy, mainlanders might call this rain “blasting rain” but here in Waimea we call this type of wind driven rain Kipu’u’pu’u rain.

The name Kipu’u’pu’u comes from long ago when Kamehameha needed more spear fighters and having heard of a company of twelve hundred young men of Waimea who were trained runners he went up the hill to Waimea to see these warriors.  Kamehameha was pleased with their swiftness and knew that they would make excellent spear fighters.  These warriors called themselves the Kipu’u’pu’u after the icy cold stinging rain of their homeland.

Last night was certainly a fine example Kipu’u’pu’u rain  with winds easly at 35 to 40 mph.  As I took this shot I could barely stand and I was a little skeptical if I could even get a shot.

After capturing three shots of the Moonbow I was completely soaked on my backside from the driving rain and I was freezing cold from the 3500 feet in elevation even though I had jeans and a sweatshirt on!

Click here for another picture of a Moonbow from last year!

http://www.ethantweedie.com/have-you-ever-seen-a-moonbow/

I hope you enjoy.

Ethan

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Hokuloa Church, Puako Hawaii

The Hokuloa Church was erected through the inspiration of Christian faith instilled in Hawaiians by the Rev. Lorenzo Lyons (1807-1886), an American Congregational missionary who came to this island in 1832. The church structure now stands as a tribute to his labors which began in the village of Puako about 1835.

Some history of Puako from The Puako Store Website

http://puakogeneralstore.com/History.html
The Puako area, in the times of the Hawaiian monarchy, was called Lalamilo and was part of a wedge shaped (ahupuaha) land division of the government (crown) land of Waimea in the district of South Kohala. The earliest written documentation about Puako comes from William Ellis during his 1823 circumnavigation of the Island. Lorenzo Lyons, the missionary who came to Waimea in 1934, had Puako as part of his parish, and the entire village of 60 people built the Hokuloa Church in 1852. The Chapel still stands, but the accompanying coral and limestone schoolhouse was lost to the 1946 tidal wave.

No one knows the native origins of the Puako name, but the area was named before William Ellis and Rev. Lyons arrived and written as Puakoo, Puakou and Puako. Old timers also suggest it was named for the tassling sugar can, an indigenous plant of Hawaii. Puakou, possibly speaking for the beautiful orange flower of the large and shady Kou trees which lined Puako Bay until the kiawe edged them out, is another possibility.

The first known photograph of Puako was taken in 1859 during the low flank eruption of Mauna Loa when an enormous cinder cloud hovered over a village of 15 to 20 grass-roofed homes and the church.

From the 1900 to 1914, John Hind of Kohala had a sugar plantation on the plains behind Puako. Initially, the harvest was excellent, but the source of water became erratic and the soil salinity could not be controlled. The mill was at #78 Puako and train tracks were laid along the beach to haul cane. The tracks are still visible in spots, but are covered at high tide, as the beach was 30 feet wider at that time. Originally, mules pulled the sugar carts, but a modern steam engine, names Puako, was specially built and put in service.

Until the 1950s, Puako was accessible only by boat, and by the trail known as the Kings Highway, which could then be followed all the way to Kona. Several konani game boards can be found etched in the black lava on the beaches, and a field of some 3,000 petroglyphs of great variety and mystery is not far inland from the community. Puako has long held “mana” and a sense of importance far beyond its recorded status.

In 1952, the county began selling lots along what was then a narrow dirt road. Puako was undeveloped and undesirable to some, while a lure of great magnitude to others. For all who came to see their purchase in 1952, it was a kiawe jungle; the beaches was often inaccessible for weeks as new residents cut and fought and cleared their way towards the sea. Few lots sold initially, and a second auction was held later. The initial lots sold for $300 to $1,000.

Forty-five years have passed since development began in much the same warmth and gentle weather pattern so admired in the islands. When catching the onshore breezes from the ocean, or the scented trades from the mountains, life at Puako is pleasant almost beyond all description. Puako is the area with the least amount of annual rainfall on the island and some say, the most sunshine.

I hope you enjoy.

Ethan

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The World’s Tallest Mountain, Mauna Kea

The world’s tallest mountain you say?

Well yes!  Most mountains are measured at their base, which happens to be sea level.  What if you measured a mountain from where it began its life as is the case with volcanoes?  Mauna Kea is a massive volcano here on the Big Island that began its early days at the bottom of the ocean some 15,000 below sea level!!  Even if it just barely made it above sea level, it would still be a big mountain in its own respect, but the story doesn’t end there!

Mauna Kea is so massive and heavy it actually bends the earths crust another 3,000 feet! Mauna Kea rises 18,000 feet to just reach sea level!  She didn’t stop there though, layer after layer of lava, like a giant wedding cake, she reached a magnificent height of 13,796 feet above sea level!!  Let’s do the math, 18,000 + 13,796 is almost 32,000 feet!  That is taller than Mt. Everest at just over 29,000 feet!

Mauna Kea had glaciers!!  Glaciers you say?  15,000 years ago when the Earth was much cooler Mauna Kea had a glacier some 25 square miles and around 500 feet thick.  You can see glacial moraines, rocks with glacial striations on Mauna Kea.  Mauna Kea even erupted underneath the glacier creating massive melting of the glacier and the subsequent run off eroded the side of the mountain creating gulches, a well know gulch called Pohakuloa Gulch can be seen from the Saddle Road.  Since that time the Earth has warmed back up melting the glacier on the summit.  Mauna Kea still gets snow each year, some more than others.  In college I was the Vice President of the University of Hawaii Ski Club!

Mauna Kea has a lake on it!  A lake you say?   Lake Waiau, which is at 13,024, makes it the 7th highest lake in the United States!

Bugs with Antifreeze?   Just when you thought you’d heard everything…. The Wekiu bug likes to eat its food frozen, it waits for bugs from lower elevations to get blown to the summit area where the freeze.  The Wekiu bug then sucks their blood out!  How does the Wekiu Bug keep from freezing?  It has antifreeze in its blood!

Dark Matter and Black Holes?  Mauna Kea is the best place in the world for viewing the night sky and is home to 13 observatories.  Mauna Kea is the choice place because of two primary reasons, its altitude making the summit area above the weather below keeping the summit clear for viewing.  The second  reason is there isn’t much light pollution hear on the Big Island.

Of the many observatories the Keck Observatory really stands out, being responsible for many breakthrough discoveries, such as the detection of planets outside our solar system and direct evidence for a model of the Big Bang theory. This instrument has detected more extrasolar planets than any other in the world.   In the near future there are plans to build the World’s largest telescope called the TMT or Thirty Meter Telescope.

Aside from all the facts and figures, Mauna Kea is a beautiful and majestic mountain.  It has so many moods and it changes daily with its various clouds and colors.  No matter where you are on the island each angle has its own unique profile.  Even Captain Cook back in 1778 marveled at the snow-covered peaks here in the tropics.

This image was taken from Mauna Loa at 11,000 feet looking across to Mauna Kea.  That morning there was a really big snowstorm, which kept the Mauna Kea summit road from opening, so I opted to see if I could get a picture from a different vantage point.

I hope you enjoy.

Ethan

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Two Secrets to Great Sunset Images




Two Secrets to Great Sunset Images

  1. Don’t actually take pictures of the sunset!
  2. WAIT!!

Yup, that’s it.

You’ve been there, you are on vacation at some tropical paradise and everyone gathers to watch the sunset, maybe even see the “Green Flash” but as soon as the sun goes below the horizon everyone leaves because supposedly the main event is over.  (I know you have done this!)

Sure, now you have a picture of the big yellow ball of fire on the horizon, but the magic is just beginning and it is called Twilight, that magical time between day and night.

There are technically three phases of Twilight.

Civil Twilight- This is the brightest phase of twilight and it lasts when the sun just dips below the horizon until it is 6 degrees below.  The light tends to have very soft hues of yellows and pinks giving images that “glow.”  Be very focused during this phase because the light will be changing rapidly.   During Civil Twilight it is possible to take pictures without a tripod.

Nautical Twilight- This phase occurs when the Sun is between 6 and 12 degrees below the horizon.  Primary colors are deep blue.  This is the time frame when the balance of natural light and city lights becomes a potential object of focus.   A tripod is necessary during Nautical Twilight.

Astronomical Twilight- This phase occurs when the Sun is between 12 and 18 degrees below the horizon.   Night occurs quickly during this phase.  Here cityscapes really can stand out.  The sky will still have some light, but it is very dark blue.  The brightest stars and planets are also visible during this phase.    A tripod is necessary during Astronomical Twilight.

This series of images was taken in Waikiki this past October.  Each picture is separated by about 15 minutes!  During the time frame when the sun was actually setting there were all kinds of people in my location including another photographer taking wedding pictures.  As soon as the sun set everybody left (Which is fine by me!).  That is when the show really got interesting if you ask me!!  Also of note, I am actually facing opposite the sunset.  Choose an interesting subject like a cool looking tree, a building, moving water etc. and then wait for the sky to change colors!

Lastly, I hope my blog entry will inspire you to think differently about sunset pictures.  Getting these types of images takes commitment because it will be long after dinnertime and you will have to lug around a heavy bulky tripod.  Hopefully you will come away with some unique images and be the envy of your Facebook friends!

I hope you enjoy.

Ethan

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Sunset at the Eva Parker Woods Cottage

The Eva Parker Woods Cottage was built by Frank Woods and Eva, the descendants of John Palmer Parker, who founded Parker Ranch. The Cottage is located at the Mauna Lani Resort here on the Big Island.

Over half a century ago, the late Francis H. I’i Brown, a sportsman and socialite with royal Hawaiian lineage, acquired the fishponds and surrounding lands from the family of Eva Parker Woods. A man equally at home in the worlds of black tie and fast cars, Brown treasured Kalahuipua’a as a retreat from the demands of urban life: a place to fish, talk story; a place where he could reach back to the simpler lifestyle of his royal Hawaiian ancestors.  He spent the most time here with his sweetheart, Winona Love, the acclaimed Hawaiian hula dancer.

I hope you enjoy.

Ethan

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When Mauna Kea Turns Pink – The Story of Two Lovers


The story of Kukahau`ula and Poli`ahu

In the story, Kukahau`ula — Ku, a deity representing the male force in the form of the rising sun — pursues Poli`ahu, the woman of the mountain. In Ku’s constant pursuit of Poli`ahu he is constantly thwarted by frost, snow and freezing rain. When Ku finally embraces his lover Poli`ahu with his brilliant pink robe the glorious pink light is cast over the summit of Mauna Kea.

Each time you see this glow over the summit of Mauna Kea think of these two lovers embracing.

For a more detailed rendition of this story click here: http://bit.ly/tevo4V

I hope you enjoy.

Ethan

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2nd Annual Christmas Tree Lighting in Waimea


It was a perfect evening for the 2nd Annual Christmas Tree Lighting at Parker School here in Waimea on the Big Island.   Residents of all ages showed up and watched the tree lighting at 6:30 PM and then enjoyed hot cocoa, Christmas Carols and a talk story of Christmases past!!

I hope you enjoy.

Ethan

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The Pink Hotel – Royal Hawaiian Waikiki


I was in Waikiki to photograph Diamond Head for a private client and as I walked by the Royal Hawaiian the clouds and sky were so dramatic.

What is it about the Royal Hawaiian Hotel that brings a smiles to people’s faces? Nostalgia of old Hawaii, the color of the hotel, the Mai Tais? Whatever it is, it is a beautiful hotel right on the beach in Waikiki.

I have never stayed at the hotel, have any of you?

Here is a brief history of the hotel.

One of the first hotels established in Waikiki, the Royal Hawaiian Hotel is considered one of the flagship hotels in Hawaii tourism. It opened its doors to guests on 1 February 1927 with a black tie gala attended by over 1,200 guests. The hotel quickly became an icon of Hawaii’s glory days. It was the Hawaii residence or Western White House of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and boasts the bar that invented the Shirley Temple cocktail (as does Chasen’s restaurant).
The Royal Hawaiian closed on 1 June 2008 for a complete renovation. The property reopened on 20 January 2009[1] as a member of The Luxury Collection Resort division of Starwood Hotels.

I hope you enjoy.

Ethan
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My High School 26 Years Later


I am happy to say that my Alma Mater is going strong after the 26 years since I walked across the stage for graduation in 1985. I got up early this past Sunday and decided to see if I could get some pictures of my school. It isn’t often you can find the school quiet as there is always some activity in and around the school.

A little history of Parker School- Parker School opened its doors in 1976 after community leaders, including Richard Smart, wanted to serve the area’s high school students and the students whose parents worked on Parker Ranch.

In order to best serve the community, there were to be no restrictions as to race, creed or geographic location of residence, and tuition was to be held at a reasonable amount. Initially, the school was opened to serve grades 9 through 12.

Middle school grades were added in 1977 and, in 2005, Parker School became a full curriculum school with the addition of kindergarten through 5th grade. Parker School continues to grow as Waimea, and its needs, grow. In 2007, a new, beautiful Lower School campus was opened.

I hope you enjoy.

Ethan

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Da Green Church (as we say in Waimea)


My home, Waimea, a place I am so proud of…

I hope you enjoy.

Ethan

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Diamond Head and Waikiki

This 760-foot tuff crater is one of Hawaii’s most famous landmarks and one of my favorite places to hike.  I didn’t get a chance to hike it this trip, but if you are on Oahu you need to put that on your list of things to do!  Go early in the day as it gets hot climbing the 175 steps and zig zagging trail.  If you are afraid of the dark I would bring a flashlight too.  You will be rewarded with one of the best views on the island.

Known as Leahi (brow of the tuna) in Hawaiian, the crater was named Diamond Head by 19th century British sailors who thought they discovered diamonds on the crater’s slopes. These “diamonds” were actually shiny calcite crystals that had no value.   Another story I have heard is there used to be a Chinese Produce store nearby and they used to sell cabbage for “dime a head!!”  Ok, I know that is cheesy, but it is still funny.

Diamond Head Crater was formed during the Honolulu Volcanic Series or post erosional phase of volcanism.   Diamond Head was built by hydromagmatic explosions that ripped through 200,000 year old coral reefs and Ko‘olau basalt. As a result, you can see pieces of coral mixed in the tuff of the cone! The eruption most likely occurred in a very short period of time from days to perhaps a month.

I hope you enjoy.

Ethan

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Kiholo Bay

Sunrise looking over at Maui.

Sunrise light and the water from a heart on the shore of Kiholo

Sunset my first night at Kiholo

Sunset my second night.  I like the way the ocean is spraying in the foreground.

After photographing the sunset I fired up my grill and had some grass fed big island beef.  So ono!

The Big Dipper pointed the way to the North Star or Polaris.  I took a very long exposure at 6 and half minutes.

Here you can see the Milky Way going up vertically.  The lights in the foreground look like lava flows but it is Waikoloa Village and Resort.

Sunrise on day two. The color lasted about 2 minutes.  It was time for coffee after shooting.

Kiholo Bay (Kiholo means fish hook and probably comes from the shape of the bay which resembles a wooden fish hook used to catch large fish) is a beautiful and historic place.  It is located within the Ahupua’a (Land Division) of Pu’u Wa’awa’a on the West side of the island of Hawaii.

Kiholo has been residence of many chiefs and a primary fishing village including Chief Kamanawa and his twin brother Kame‘eiamoku.  Both chiefs were very powerful and were said to be “uncles” of Kamehameha I. It is these two chiefs whom appear on the official shield of the Kingdom of Hawaii. Kamanawa and Kame‘eiamoku would be closely bound with the history of the Hawaiian Islands during the period of the rise of Kamehameha I.  Presumably, whoever had control over the leeward ports of the Island of Hawai‘i would play an important part in the history of the Islands during this early historical period. As it was, that role fell to Kamehameha, Kamanawa, Kame‘eiamoku, and Ke’eaumoku.

As time went on Kamehameha’s power grew and he decided to have the fishponds restored at Kiholo.  It was this source of food derived from the fishponds that helped Kamehameha support his vast fleet of canoes/warriors on their conquest of the rest of the Hawaiian Islands and finally uniting the islands under one rule by King Kamehameha the Great.

The fishponds were said to have encompassed a diameter of 2 miles with walls 6 feet high above the water with 20-foot thick walls.   One pond south of Kiholo was threatened and then destroyed by the 1801 lava flow from Hualalai, but the flow stopped short of Kiholo.  Then in 1859 Mauna Loa erupted from some 33 miles away and lava traveled that distance in 8 days and the flow completely destroyed the large fishpond, which created a new coastline.

Since the time of the destruction of the fishponds the area has had very little development as much of the land under private ownership.  Only a few residences exist to this day, thus it remains a very peaceful place.

After spending the prior few weeks intensely preparing for my Art Show, I felt that I needed some Rest and Relaxation.  The weather was looking really good and it was during the week and thus it would be un-crowded so I decided to spend some time camping down at Kiholo.   I have been to Kiholo many times, but had never gone camping so I was really excited to get down there.

My time down there was rejuvenating and I had a wonderful time swimming in the ocean, watching the Green Sea Turtles, the sunsets and sunrises, the kite surfers and just enjoyed looking at the myriad of stars at night under a moonless sky.  I did, however, get the feeling that many people had been here before me, I could feel their presence or spirit, nothing sinister or evil just all encompassing and it gave me a real sense of respect for this place.

I hope you enjoy.

Ethan

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2011 Hawaiian Cultural Festival at Pu’u Kohola Heiau











Scenes from today’s Ho`oku`ikahi Establishment Day Hawaiian Cultural Festival

I hope you enjoy.

Ethan
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Often Missed Highlight of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park


Many people visit the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and dream about seeing lava flowing down the side of the volcano and or an ocean entry with its dramatic steam cloud ascending into the sky.  For sure, all dramatic events that do occur at the Park, but Mother Nature doesn’t always cooperate!

Lately the lava erupting from Kilauea has confined itself within Pu’u O’o crater/vent and up at the summit where a lava lake is deep within a 500 ft diameter near-vertical vent inset within the east wall and floor of Halema`uma`u Crater.   I have many friends and potential visitors say they heard “nothing” is going on, but I can assure you that there is much going on within Kilauea.  Soon there will be lava flowing on the surface, but until then don’t miss out on seeing the dramatic glow up at the summit from the Jagger Visitor Center!

Ideally you ought to get to Jagger Visitor Center just as the sun is setting, as I write this that is around 7PM.  As the light fades in the sky the otherwise hidden glow from the lava lake slowly begins to show its intensity.  The evening I took these pictures the glow was very bright as the lava lake is very active and close to the surface right now.  You could hear the lava churning inside the 500-foot diameter crater bubbling and churning even though you stand almost a mile away!  Very cool!!

So go spend an afternoon playing at the park then head over to Volcano Village and grab dinner from many of the fine restaurants then go back into the park in time to see the Sun’s light fade and the glow increase from the lava within Kilauea!

Suggestions for taking images of the glow:

  1. Put your camera on a tripod or rest on the wall at the lookout.
  2. Set your camera on manual focus (DSLR)
  3. Set ISO to 800+
  4. Set camera to Manual
  5. Shutter speed at 10-30 seconds
  6. F-Stop should be relatively wide open at f/4
  7. Gently press shutter and let don’t touch or move camera while it takes the exposure.
  8. Good luck! And lets see those shots!

Ethan

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On the Edge of Light at Waipio Valley



Stunning and remote Waipio Valley.

The place name means “Curved Water” and certainly it is water that created this valley, rivers eroding Kohala Mountain over the last 450,000 years, the ocean once filled the valley when the level was higher and in recent history both in 1946 and 1960 the valley was inundated by devastating tsunamis.

The valley is often referred to as the Valley of the Kings as it was the capital and permanent residence of many early Hawaiian aliʻi (kings).

Today almost 2000-foot valley walls surround this lush valley, home to around 50 people. Many waterfalls cascade down these valley walls including Hiilawe Falls, which is around 1500 feet high! The only way down is with a 4-wheel drive on the steepest road in the United States at a maximum grade of 45 degrees! Unless you feel like hiking!!!

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The Legend of the Nightmarchers…

The Moon shining through the Koa Trees with my tent in the foreground.

The eerie shadows cast by the moon or were they the Nightmarchers?

A group of us all went camping up to Keanakolou Cabins.  Keanakolou (The Three Caves) is about 25 miles, about an hour and a half, northeast of Waimea off a bumpy and dusty 4-wheel drive road.  Needless to say the place is isolated, no power, phone, light etc.

There are several cabins at Keanakolu, but I opted to sleep in my tent to hopefully get some shots of the stars and moon etc.  Besides who could resist the cool mountain air and only the sound of the wind?  I set up my tent at the edge of the Koa forest; the others all bunked together about a football field away inside the main cabin.

On the second night we all turned in pretty early after hiking etc and I headed down to my tent around 10pm.  It didn’t take long to fall asleep, but I ended up waking at around 1 am as nature was calling.  I reluctantly crawled out of my warm cozy nest and stepped into the cool and windy night.  The moon was very bright and shinning through the old Koa trees casting some eerie shadows and the wind was stirring robustly.  The stars were also very bright, looking like diamonds, even though the moon was so bright. One of my philosophies about my photography is to always make the extra effort and get the difficult shot.  At this particular moment, the last thing I wanted to do was get my camera and tripod out and take some pictures, but that is what I opted to do.

Thoughts about being all alone in the middle of nowhere started to dominate my psyche and I began to remember the stories about the Nightmarchers (My best friend Jonah used to tell stories about hearing the Nightmarchers when he was hiking back from Waimanu Valley.).  According to Hawaiian legend, night marchers (huaka‘i po in Hawaiian) are ghosts of ancient warriors. They supposedly roam large sections of the island chain, and can be seen by groups of torches. They can usually be found in areas that were once large battlefields.   Legend has it that if you look a night marcher straight in the eye, you will be forced to walk among them for eternity, but if you have a relative taken by them, you will be spared. Hawaiians say that in the presence of night marchers, one should lie down on their stomach, face down to avoid eye contact, stay quiet, breathe shallowly, and don’t move. Some say that they may nudge you to provoke a reaction so they can take you.

After getting several long exposures I had to keep telling myself to just relax, that it was only my mind that was scaring me.  Luckily there were no Nightmarchers this time… just in my mind.

What would you do if you heard the Nightmarchers?  Do you have any stories about them?   Leave a comment!

Kohala Mountain Panorama

Waimea’s beloved Kohala Mountain as taken from the plains of Mauna Kea on Parker Ranch.  Kohala is the only extinct volcano on the Big Island and last erupted over 60,000 years ago and is about 450,000 years old.  The mountain is close to 5,500 feet tall.  There is no literal Hawaiian translation for Kohala, which is the name of a district of northern Hawai`i.

This image compiled using eight separate images and stitched together.  Click on picture to see a larger version.

I hope you enjoy.

Ethan

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Altocumulus Clouds at Church Row Waimea, HI


More cool clouds last night above the Big Island. This year seems like we have had a lot of high clouds forming laminar layers.

I was headed up Kawaihae Road from a photo assignment and saw these high clouds above Waimea so I cruised over to Church Row .  The first picture is of Imiola Church (Circa 1855). http://imiolachurch.com/# The second picture is Ke Ola Mau Loa Church or fondly named the “Green Church”

I hope you enjoy.

Ethan

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Kahinahina “Road”

We began our adventure from Saddle Road around 6,000 feet to circumnavigate Mauna Kea on the Kahinahina “Road.” Kahinahina is Hawaiian for silversword .  We started our drive at around 1:30 and drove all the way to our overnight stay at Pu’u Kaluamakani arriving at around 5 pm.  After watching the sunset and then the amazing stars we fell asleep in our tents.  The night air got pretty cold!  We all awoke to a beautiful morning and had some strong coffee and breakfast all the while watching our native birds the Amakihi forage in the Mamane and plumb trees next to our camp.   The next leg our our trip would take us from 7,500 feet to around 9,500 heading around the northern part of Mauna Kea.  The going was pretty slow as the road was pretty gnarly in places.  We saw one vehicle parked during our entire drive and one vehicle on the road and a total of two people over the two days on the road.  All in all it was a great time with some great friends.

This was at the end of the trip after I connected with the Mauna Kea Access Road.  I was coming down the hill and noticed the (never before seen) penumbra or Earth’s shadow at sunset.

Almost home after our camping trip I came upon Pu’u Nohona o Hae and the crescent Moon above.

It was so dark at night and the stars were unbelievable.  You may not be able to discern the Milky Way in the small image, but you can see the lights of my 4Runner.

Our overnight stay in a Pu’u included ripe sweet plumbs.  We were at about 7,600 feet elevation.

Our “Hotel” room view was great for sunset.  Maui is to the right of the sun just barely above the clouds.

Rounding the North side of Kahinhina Road. We are at around 9,500 feet.  Below would be Lapahoehoe.  Not shown in this picture is a plane crash on the side of a cinder cone on Mauna Kea at 11,300 feet.  A Navy pilot in 1971 crashed his jet and died.

Our trip would not have been complete without seeing some Silverswords along the way!

Rainbow and Ohia Lehua at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park


I got to the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park at about 7:30AM and it was one of those rainy days at the park.  I decided to heard over to the Jagger Visitor Center to check out the Caldera and use the restroom before a meeting I was scheduled to attend at 8AM.  I could see a faint rainbow off to the west as the sun rose, but nothing to really get too excited about. When I came back to my vehicle I again saw the rainbow only now it was way more intense.  Frantic to capture the rainbow I also wanted to frame the picture with an Ohia tree etc.  After roaming around I finally found some Lehua blooms that would be worthy of a picture!  I hope you enjoy.  If you would like to purchase this image please go to http://ethantweedie.smugmug.com/Landscapes/Prints/16653856_jRqpmL

Bucking Bronco!!!!


Tyler Cox rides this bronco like no other! I don’t konw about you, but this has to take a lot of guts to get on a horse or bull and hold on for dear life!! Get R Done!

Taken at the Honoka’a Rodeo Memorial Day 2011

Getting Ready for the Honoka’a Rodeo




I left my house not knowing where I was going to go take pictures when I noticed a ton of vehicles at the Parker Ranch Rodeo Arena. I decided to check and see what was going on!

All the riders where getting ready for the Memorial Day Weekend Rodeo out in Honoka’a. I saw one of my friends Kimo out there so I took a few pictues of him.

Enjoy

Ethan
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The Light on Hoku’ula (Buster Brown)

Climbed up Hoku’ula (Buster Brown) to watch the sunset. The light that streams across from the Kohala Mountain is always so amazing.

Pu’eone

I went camping this past weekend at a place called Malaekahana over on the North Shore of Oahu.  My friend Tommy brought his canoe Pu’eone and on Saturday we rode the waves just outside the beach break.  It was a lot of fun getting back in a canoe again!!  I remembered Pu’eone from my paddling days out Outrigger Canoe Club in Waikiki as Tommy bought the canoe from the club.  I asked my friend Tommy if he knew what Pu’eone meant and he didnt know.  My friend Mahealani said it meant sand hill or dune and that meaning didn’t quite fit.  I then googled the meaning and found some lyrics to a Hawaiian song and the translation in the song said it was like a roller coaster.  So that would make sense because this canoe is designed to ride waves or hills of water!!   So if that is the case then Pu’eone is a perfect name!

If anyone knows a better translation let me know!

Thanks Tommy for bringing Pu’eone!!

The Koa Tree

The Koa tree is one of my favorite trees, such a majestic tree. In the highlands you will find this tree covered in lichen like this specimen off Mana Road. You can see the light green lichen reflecting the light of the “Golden Hour”

Image may be purchased at http://ethantweedie.smugmug.com/Landscapes/Need-to-Print/16653856_jRqpmL

Hog the Bounty Hunter!!

Roger and Tammy Faye!!

Tammy Faye the Hog

Tammy Faye the Hog

You probably have seen Hog The Bounty Hunter along the highway between the Mauna Lani and Hapuna Beach. I have often wondered what his story is so today I finally had the chance to check him out!

His real name is Roger Downing. He is from Mississippi. Roger is a really nice guy, very smart. Roger told me he is about to close on a place in Ocean View Estates, so in the meantime he has been camping out on this side of the island.

The pig is from Manoa Valley on Oahu. A hunter there shot it with a bow and arrow. He had it stuffed and now carries that pig where ever he goes. Today was funny because the wind was blowing its tail and it looked real! Be sure to stop by and meet Roger and talk story, Roger has many!!

Cynthia Sweeney of Big Island Weekly interviewed Roger. Her article is great!!!! Below is the link.

A Hog Day Afternoon

Hog The Bounty Hunter’s Website

Youtube

Aloha Spirit

I am forever blown away by the spirit of Aloha. My good friend and real estate agent, Stacy Disney, (http://stacydisney.com/) brought me some fresh Mahi Mahi and my other friend Mahealani Winters dropped of some of the BEST avocado ever!! I love my friends here on the Big Island, they are the reason I came home to Hawaii. I love you guys.

So I pan seared the Mahi Mahi in olive oil and added some sea salt and black pepper.  I also added some Lehua Honey and let in blacken ever so slightly and then let it simmer.  I cooked some brown rice and then drizzled the sauce from the Mahi Mahi.  For my side salad I sliced the Waimea avocado and sprinkled it with sea salt and fresh black pepper. Simple but so good!

Ethan

The Things I saw Today January 21st 2011!




Crazy sunrise on Mauna Kea, it was some effect from my lens, but I have never seen that before??

Beautiful snow on Pu’u Ha’u Kea with Mauna Loa in the Distance.

My shadow with moon

The last photo was taken a few hours later at Hapuna Point!!!

What a day!!

In All Her Grandeur: Mauna Kea Panorama (PLEASE CLICK ON IMAGE FOR FULL SIZE)

This photo of Mauna Kea was taken with 3 separate images using the Canon 1D Mark IV and combined in in CS5.  It was shot with the Canon 85mm f 1.2 at f/10 at 1/45 ISO 200 (If you wanted to know!)  I hope you like the photo as much as I enjoyed taking the image!!

From Hawaiian Cowboy Country

This cow was walking along the fence and crossed the path of the sun, I thought it looked cool.  Very spiritual place along Mauna Kea Ranch Lands.

Where Glaciers Used to Roam

15,000 years ago a glacier sat on top of Mauna Kea.  What you are looking at is the glacial moraine at the top of the mountain.  Then Mauna Kea erupted under the ice sheet and the melt off created the Pohakuloa Gulch.  After the Earth warmed 15,000 years ago the ice melted.

Mr. Pueo!!! (Hawaiian Owl)

So there I was, heading up the Saddle Road towards Volcano National Park.  Camera at the ready searching for Mr or Mrs Pueo.  Then I saw what I thought was an owl on the fence and the realized it was a piece of plastic that I have seen caught on the fence.  In my mind I had written the Pueo sighting off, then as I passed the piece of plastic that I thought had tricked me was a Pueo!!  Quick, reverse!!!!!!  My friend stayed long enough for me to take some nice photos in the morning light!!

Feathered Friends

I was cruising along the Saddle Road just before the 1935 Mauna Loa flow and saw two Nene feeding near the road.  I pulled a U-turn and thankfully had my telephoto lens on the camera and ready to go!  I was far enough away not to bother them, but close enough to get some excellent shots in the nice morning light.  Eventually they made there way beyond where I could see them, but it was a nice treat!!!  There are approximately 500 Nene in existence in the Hawaiian Islands.

Purple Mauna Majesty

So I am am sitting at my computer and I look out the window and see Mauna Kea with perfect light cast upon its slopes and I think to myself, “gee how many pictures can I take of this mountain?”  Well, I am glad I captured the late summer light because the hues of purple were incredible.  I hope you enjoy!!  If you like this picture let me know!!

Beautiful Waimea, My Hometown

Waimea on the Big Island is a beautiful place.  It is situated between Kohala and Mauna Kea at an elevation of 2500 feet which keeps the days and nights cooler than down at the ocean.  It is home of Parker Ranch, Canada France Hawaii and Keck Telescope headquarters.  A visit to the Big Island isn’t complete without a visit here!

Sunny Afternoon at Waipio

Located along the Hamakua Coast on the northeast shore of the Big Island of Hawaii, the Waipiʻo Valley is the largest and most southern of the seven valleys on the windward side of the Kohala Mountains.  The Waipiʻo Valley is a mile wide at the coastline and almost six miles deep.  Along the coast is a beautiful black sand beach often used by motion picture production companies.

On both sides of the valley there are cliffs reaching almost 2000 feet with hundreds of cascading waterfalls, including one of Hawaii’s most celebrated waterfalls – Hiʻilawe.

Beautiful and friendly horses of Waipio Valley

Spent the afternoon last weekend down in Waipio Valley.  We came across this mother horse and her foal and fed them some bananas which the really loved!!!  Can you see the love in Momma’s eyes?

Mauna Kea Sunset!!!

We went up to Mauna Kea to see the shooting stars but who cares if we only saw two!!!

Kawaihae Sunset, Big Island

Kawaihae harbor is the witness to much history here on the Big Island.   This is the home of Pu’ukohola Heiau that Kamehameha built.  Kapoukahi, a powerful kahuna from Kauai, prophesized that war would end if Kamehameha constructed a heiau dedicated to the war god Ku at Pu’ukohola.  All of the stones that were used to build the Heiau were carried man to man from Pololu Valley forming a human chain nearly 25 miles long, the laborers handed the water-worn lava rocks one person to another up and over Kohala Mountain to this site.  It is also the location that the young John Parker arrived on a sailing ship bound for China.  He liked Hawaii so much in 1809 he decided to hide from his ship in the bushes until the ship was out of site.   Eventually John Parker would go on to create one of the oldest and largest cattle ranches in the United States, Parker Ranch.